Cynthia Milton's Paradise Lost

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Info Last Added on December 02, 2010

As most visitors to this site will know, Cynthia Milton is busy travelling the world and looking for adventure on her BMW R80G/S and is trying to keep us all updated on the progress of her Round The World Trip. Due to space constraints on her Yahoo Groups site (ie it's about full), any new photos of her travels will appear here where anyone is free to browse. The only downside to this is that photos won't appear instantly but will depend on my having time to sort them but it does mean that you may see far more being uploaded. Photos may be a little out of chronological order but will appear in batches alongside the date the batch was sent to me with the oldest batch appearing first.

For ease of maintenance, the latest photos will be added to the later pages

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Update 27th August 2007  Coming Home after 3 years on the road

It was all rather silly, really.

I stopped for a photo, and did what almost every motorcyclist has done
at least once.

It was gravel. Having stopped, I put my feet down, and my left one
slipped and I and the bike fell over. It's just that I caught my wrist
awkwardly.

A couple of chaps in a bakkie (pick-up) stopped and helped me pick up
the bike. I just thought I'd sprained the wrist. Had a ciggie, then got
back on the bike and carried on. It hurt a lot, but at least one can do
clutchless changes easily. Stopping meant gauging the moment and simply
stalling at the appropriate moment. Starting meant using my right hand
to put my fingers around the clutch lever then pulling the right-hand
bar back with my left arm rigid, and screwing up my eyes as I let the
clutch out.

It was 200 miles up the road that I saw the first red H sign at the
turn-off for Springbok, and that for Annie's B+B which instructed me to
follow the H, so that was easy. I managed to time myself at the robot
(traffic light) so I didn't have to stop, and ground to a halt in the
B+B car park. I got off the bike and more or less collapsed in a heap.
The owner is Pet, who has been magic. She gave me a big mug of coffee,
then sent me round to the hospital. They strapped me up and told me to
come back in the morning for an X-ray.

There were no rooms available so I slept at Pet's flat. Thursday morning
I went back to the hospital and was filmed.

"It's a Colles fracture. We see a lot of these in older women."
"Are you calling me an older woman?"

"Er, well, anyway, report back to the operating theatre at noon so we
can reduce it, and don't eat or drink anything." So I did, and didn't.

After being sedated, manipulated and plastered, they had one of the
security guards walk me back safely round the corner, where Pet revived
me with a large G+T.

The shippers have been great, and Pet found a local guy who's taken the
bike to Cape Town to the agent there, from where it will be on a ship to
arrive in (probably) Felixstowe in a couple of weeks or so.

Getting me to the Cape is a little more difficult - no air taxi, and I
don't fancy the overnight chicken bus or a crowded minibus taxi in my
state. But Pet's found a lady driving to Stellenbosch tomorrow morning
who'll take me, and I can get a private taxi from there. I'll need to
find a hospital and get a fibreglass cast - this plaster weighs a ton
and is extremely uncomfortable.

The hospital seemed unable to charge me for anything but the X-rays, so
I'm making a donation if I can catch Matron in her office. Cecilia the
theatre nurse (a motorcyclist) came to see me at Annie's and is
arranging that for me.

Reg and Mo are in Poland until the end of next week, so I'll fly back
then and stay until I can get back into my house in November. And Des
and Marina in Velddrif have said that when I come back to do the
Cape-to-Cairo leg I must start from their house. Marina's an artist, and
I've asked her to paint me and The Old Dear.

It will happen - just not at the moment, I'm afraid. I'm just pissed off
that I haven't been able to do the whole circumnavigation in one hit, as
was the intention. But at least I've managed to visit all seven
continents, which in itself is an achievement. And 39 countries, 12
pairs of tyres, 8,000 litres of petrol, three GPSs, 74,000 miles, three
years, six broken bones, a language, the ability to swear and say
thank-you in around a dozen others, and made loads of new friends in
many countries and most continents (all of them if you count the penguins).

But I couldn't have done any of it without the help and encouragement of
you lot. It's been a privilege. Thanks is not enough.

'Under Asian Skies', Sam Manicoms' latest book to be launched November 3rd at CW's in Dorset - knowing Sam it'll be another cracker so why not get down there and support him.

Should be a great read and is endorsed by that old favourite, Ted Simon.

Under Asian Skies’
The new adventure motorcycle travel book from Sam Manicom 
is coming soon!
 
'A unique and wonderful adventure.'
Ted Simon
 
Background:
A year of dramatic adventure evolved into an eight year, 200,000 mile journey around the world. Sam’s first motorcycle adventure travel book Into Africa’ received high acclaim from reviewers and has sold all over the world.
Novice biker Sam Manicom left his job and sold his house to ride his R80GS the length of Africa. But once the travel bug bit, he couldn’t stop. Under Asian Skies is the sequel to his first book Into Africa, and is similarly packed with adventure. Sam narrowly escapes a serious wipe-out in the vast Australian Outback, falls critically ill in Thailand and is rescued by a prostitute, gets arrested in Madras, dodges the manic traffic of India’s Grand Trunk Road and rides sheet ice on the road home through Turkey.
To make ends meet, he works as a fruit picker in Australia. He meets hippies, aborigines and escapees from the law, gets involved with smugglers and falls in love.
What shines through is his sheer joy of being on the road, and the pure adrenaline buzz that each day can bring. Every day holds an adventure and once again, those adventures demand that Sam’s Guardian Angel is on hand to work overtime. Just one man, a motorcycle and a dream being lived – every day.
Why does Sam get arrested this time? How many of the dreaded lurgies can you catch? What happens when a solo adventurer decides to take a pillion on board? How is a trip like this funded? What’s ‘Full Moon Fever’? Is Asia really mystical? How does a biker deal with the poverty? Is smuggling really a good idea? What kit worked the best? Who else is out on the road? What was that about romance? And what was that about two wheels being the best possible way to see the world?
"Stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey." - Fitzhugh Mullan
 
Release Date: November 2007. £12.99
34 Colour photographs, and line drawings throughout.
To be available from www.sam-manicom.com

Leaving From England & Vladivostock

Early August 2004

The Reprobates at the Leaving Party

The Leaving Party

 

 

 

31st August 2004 Leaving

Cynthia Leaving

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Cynthia Leaving

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Cynthia Leaving

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Cynthia Leaving

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Cynthia Leaving

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Cynthia Leaving

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Cynthia Leaving

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Sept/October Coastline near Nahodka

 

Coastline near Hahodka

Somewhere in Russia

Group photo somewhere in Russia

Cynthia in Vladivostok

Cynthia in Vladivostok

Railway Waiting Room

 

Railway Waiting Room